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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)
spoke the earth, talk to booktv about the anthology and aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in haiti. >> well now, joining us here on our booktv set is edwidge ys is danticat, who is an author, and t most recent book is "so spokes the earth: the haiti i know, the haiti i wantto know." edwidge danticat come in thhaiti january 2010, where were you? >> on january 2010 i was here in miami. i was in a supermarket with myus daughter when someone called me and said that there had been and earthquake in haiti. rthquake in. of course, so many lives were changed on. i lost so many family and friends in and the country lost something like 200,000 people. >> host: when was your first visit down to haiti? >> i had a very little bit at that time. i went to see some family and friends and see how they were doing. >> host: so you got to haiti three weeks after the earthquake. what was it like when you got their. >> guest: it was difficult to see all that disruption, to see all the suffering of people were going through. but nothing like it was working actually living there at that time. you know, a
the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" talked to booktv about the earthquake in haiti. st >> now joins us here on the booktv set is edwidge danticat. who isjoinin ang author and heo recentk book is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" in january 2010, where were you?januy >> on january 2010, i was here in miami. i was in a supermarket with my daughters when someone called me and said there had been an here earthquake i in haiti, of cours, so muchn so many lives werehait. changed them. i lost two family members in the earthquake, and many friends,li and the country lost something like 100,000 people.frie >> when did you get down haiti after the earthquake. when was your first visit down.o >> i i had a very little baby at the time. get back until a few weeks later to see some family and to see some friends and see how they were doing. >> you got haiti three weeksm after the earthquake. >> it was s a difficult trip. what was it like when you gote there? >> it was difficult to see all that destruction,
there's going to be a kind of... there will be an outcome. >> woodruff: from haiti, fred de sam lazaro reports on the efforts to stem a deadly cholera epidemic that began after the 2010 earthquake. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks to author and journalist tom ricks about what he describes as the decline of american military leadership. >> today nobody gets credit for anything and mediocrity is accepted as a core value in the performance of generals. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: neither side showed signs of budging today as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal
>>> coming up, in haiti we report on one successful ministry of healing and shelter. despite natural disaster and failed bury rock sees. >> the surprise to everybody including to us is that we could do it all pretty much without batting an eye lash. >> a prominent evangelical leader reflects on 25 years in the culture wars. plus, menorahs and lighting the hanukkah lamps. >> welcome. i'm bob aber nathy. it's good to have you with us. members of congress came together for the annual lighting of the capitol christmas tree, although they were deadlocked on matters. religious groups advocated for action on the fiscal cliff and other issues. a coalition of religious leaders, law enforcement and business people urged lawmakers to prioritize immigration reform. the group included both liberal and conservative clergy who called for legislation that respects the dignitiy of immigrants and creates a pathway to citizenship and secures the border. >> it's time to secure on you values, values that include, faith and hope and charity. >> jewish groups are divided over israel's plans to cons
a special report from haiti where we found an american priest and doctor who is helping thousands of victims of earthquakes, hurricanes, hiv, cholera and not least government bury rock sees. they're succeeds not with a big top down plan but by listening to what the haitians want. >> early each morning in the chapel, the shrouded bodies of infants and one adult on the are counted, the names written down for prayers that follow a daily mass. >> anybody that dies in our arms as they say in our place, then their body is first brought to the chapel so the very next mass we have the prayers for the dead and for their peace and for the transformation of their life for eternity and for the strength and courage of their family. >> the father spends much of his day attacking the infant mortality he sees so literally each morning. he's the founder of one of the largest medical care facilities for children and many adults in haiti. it's grown by necessity often out of tragedy. he's a member of the community of passion did tates and he beg years ago with what seemed a more straightforward mission, a shel
it to make a little bit of income. you know, $3 a day to someone in haiti is huge. >> reporter: this 10-year-old lives in haiti and she had been getting around on a broken wheelchair until she received her new p.e.t. and while it's 2,000 miles from haiti to leighton, iowa, he says the tangible amount of his work shortened the distance. >> i feel like we're not doing enough. >> want me to tell you a joke? >> reporter: for these old men, generosity truly is its own reward. dean reynolds, cbs news, leighton, iowa. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs this morning," an update on washington's fiscal cliff negotiations. we'll hear from republican senator bob corker, plus the damaging economic strikes looming at more than a dozen of our nation's forts. >>> a guy getting fit will sit with the best-selling authors of "fit" this year. that's the "cbs morning news" for this friday. thanks for watching. i'm duarte geraldino. have a great day. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald >>> hi, everyone. good morning. it's our last friday of 2012! decemb
, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bit of humanitarian aid and a lot of courage and hope it is amazing that people in desperate circumstances can do to improve theirs life. so seven years ago we really have a feeling that in the united states, we really need to increase our hope also. and we decided to do that by creating a global art project, the world, tree of hope. and what you see behind you is a live,
practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operating rooms, they produce their own medical oxygen, they have ct scanners and they can do almost anything a hospital on the west coast can do and we can park them offshore as we did in haiti and in haiti they spent
haiti. >> this is made out of what? >> a reup cycle second-degree oil drum. >> that is. >> an up-cycle oil drum. >> that is amazing! who would have thought. where do you get this stuff. >> >> if you go to macy's, they have a whole section for haiti's artisans. >> and finally, are you going to mail cards or do you -- . >> i will not mail cards. i do not like to discourage people from sending greetings, but paperless post has designs you can email. and they donate to charity. >> i stop sending cards. >> i call somebody up and have a conversation with them. >> exactly. 2.65billion christmas cards purchased every year. >> away they go in the trash then. >> yes. >> thank you for being here. sierra magazine has more ideas. you can get that or take a look at it at sierramagazine.com. that isiermagazine.com. -- sierramagazine.com. more ahead. don't go away! thank you! . >>> well, what a popular event, what to do if you are jewish on christmas? the answer, jewish comedy and a chinese restaurant, known as kung pow! >> welcome back, lisa. >> thank you for having me. this year i turn
. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all of the governors into a conference call with the president to make sure that all their needs were being met in the advance of a hurricane arrival. so, we really had all of government, from local all the way up to the white house, fully included in that response. but the haiti response was certainly informative in
of income, you know. $3 a day income to someone in haiti is huge. >> reporter: ten-year-old jevaleen benjamin lives in haiti, and she had been getting around on a broken wheelchair until she received her new p.e.t. and while it's 2,000 miles from haiti to leighton, iowa, bruxvoort says the tangible results of his work shorten the distance. >> i feel like we're not doing enough. i'd like to do more. but to be able to do something for other people is just so rewarding. >> want me to tell you a joke? [ laughter ] >> reporter: for these old men, generosity truly is its own reward. dean reynolds, cbs news, leighton, iowa. >> that is the "cbs evening news" tonight. for scott pelley, i'm jeff glor. i'll see you tomorrow on "cbs this morning." good night. captions by: caption colorado comments@captioncolorado.com >>> >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald. >>> good evening, i'm elizabeth cook. >> i'm allen martin. they say the first step is admitting you have a problem. and tonight oakland city leaders have done exactly that. three -- three months ago they acknowledged there is no
what the environment means in haiti. >> the environment means a lot. haiti is a country that has been hit by seasonal climate events almost every year. weather events and hurricanes have severely affected the country. every year, thousands of people are dying. many have been displaced. many others are still homeless. as a youth, it is my responsibility to take part in these activities, to do something about it. i would like to see climate justice. >> what the climate justice mean to you? >> for me, eradication of poverty. that means developed countries need to take responsibility by fulfilling -- by providing finance, which is key for countries like haiti. >> marco, what the climate justice mean to you? >> all of that, including the fact that currently, emissions in the atmosphere, 75% are coming from developed countries , countries that have done everything for over a century and now they're trying to place the burden on developed countries -- developing countries who barely have enough to eat. we have a severe injustice here that we need to act on. climate justice, in a nutshell, me
's richard lui travelled to haiti, sat down with former president jimmy carter and about middle east peace. >>> first we flash back to a time that communism was everywhere, or so some thought. you're watching msnbc. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral. see why millions of people have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement ins
senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, including one in western new york, where an attacker lay in wait for a fire crew. >> responding firefighte
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 131 (some duplicates have been removed)

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